Image credit and thanks: BBH Singapore

Tech for Good Solutions©

The World Bee Project vision is to deliver state of the art knowledge directly to the hundreds of millions of smallholder farmers around the world to enhance the contribution of pollinators to food security, farmer livelihoods and national economies.

 

Over 75% of the nutritious food we eat depends on pollination, but pollinators are declining at an alarming rate, around 30% per year. This is threatening our global food supply (an annual $600 billion worth of agricultural activity) and 1.4 billion agriculture-dependent livelihoods.

We work with local initiatives to enhance any existing initiatives underway and create overarching sustainable innovative solutions to make it attractive to smallholder farmers to adopt practices such as planting for pollinator density and diversity as well as for indigenous crop diversity and stability.

Agricultural biodiversity ensures vital ecosystem services, such as pollinating plants, creating and maintaining healthy soils, controlling pests and providing habitat for wildlife that are vital to food production and agricultural livelihoods.

AI based Precision Apiculture to Optimise Yields

We offer opportunities to smallholder and commercial farmers and beekeepers in developing economies to optimise their crop and honey yields by using the same technology that currently helps commercial farmers in developed economies to optimise their yields. The technology ensures hyper-efficient pollination that can increase crop yields by 30% on average for crops including almonds, berries, soybean, gourds, sunflowers, apples, canola, and cotton. For beekeepers, whether commercial or hobbyist, the value of Precision Apiculture lies in improved bee and hive health and better honey yields.

Our research and practical learning-by-doing programmes make it attractive to smallholder farmers to adopt sustainable practices such as planting for pollinator density and diversity, as well as for indigenous crop diversity and stability. We help farmers learn about the role of agricultural biodiversity in ensuring vital ecosystem services, such as pollinating plants, creating and maintaining healthy soils, controlling pests and providing habitat for wildlife – all of which are vital to food production and agricultural livelihoods.

 

We enable local farmers and beekeepers to directly benefit during project timelines.

We work with local governments, universities, businesses  and communities around the world and ensure that each of projects is scientifically validated and directly benefits participating communities during project timelines.

If you’d like to sponsor our work or collaborate with us or invest in our work, please write to us here.

Agricultural economists and other development specialists generally agree that investing in agriculture is an effective strategy for reducing poverty, inequality and hunger, especially in countries where the sector employs a large share of the population (FAO, 2012World Bank, 2007). Many advocates emphasize the importance of “smallholder farming” or “family farming”, with claims often made that smallholders or family farms are responsible for a large share of the world’s food production (e.g., Fairtrade International, 2013)—or that a large share of the food consumed in Africa and Asia is produced by smallholders in those regions (HLPE, 2013IFAD and UNEP, 2013).