Image credit and thanks: Gary Ellis

University of Edinburgh Apiary Project

The University of Edinburgh Apiary Project is a member of the World Hive Network©.

Edinburgh is the greenest city in the United Kingdom with well-managed parks and green spaces and an impressive track record in biodiversity conservation.

Our partnership with the University of Edinburgh Apiary Project has the potential to bring together schools, businesses and communities in Edinburgh, to learn from the bees and generate fascinating stories that will raise awareness and create connections with local, national and global audiences.

“The University of Edinburgh Apiary is working with the World Bee Project CIC to install a monitoring sensor on one if its hives which will generate new insights into the links between honey bee health, hive conditions, varying environments and the pollination services bees provide to maintain ecosystem health. Pollinating insects are currently suffering from habitat loss and a lack of foraging sites. Managed and unmanaged green spaces are vital in supporting pollinator populations on which we all rely. While work is being done in parks and gardens to plant trees and flowers that can provide much-needed food for these insects, it is important to study how effective such schemes are. One way to achieve this is to monitor the strength and health of bee populations in these areas and compare them to those in other environments.“
Matthew Richardson Apiary Manager, University of Edinburgh Apiary Project

 

Other Projects

‘Super Farm’, North India

‘Super Farm’, North India

We initiated a two-year project in north India in partnership with the School of Agriculture, Policy and Development (SAPD) University of Reading, United Kingdom, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India, and Himalayan Farmlands Initiative, a local NGO.

Bees in East Jerusalem

Bees in East Jerusalem

To celebrate the right to life, food, shelter and wellbeing, for women and bees in adversity, Sabiha Malik imagined a model that could be implemented in areas where socio-economic inequalities constrain the capacity of the poorest and most vulnerable women living in hardship conditions.

World Bee Count

World Bee Count

To engage people everywhere in celebrating pollinators on World Bee Day, The World Bee Project launched World Bee Count 2020. We invited people to take a picture of the nearest pollinator they could find and upload it to an interactive Global Pollinator Map, using a free mobile app.