Overview

 

POLLINATORS ARE A KEY PART OF BIODIVERSITY AND INDICATE HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS AND ECOSYSTEMS THAT ALL LIFE DEPENDS ON

“To be sustainable, conservation needs to be resilient, adaptive, and coherent in the face of overwhelming complexity. This is what The World Bee Project is striving for.”
— Sabiha Malik, Founder

In the UK we have around 270 species of bees, just under 250 of which are solitary or 'wild' bees. Solitary bees are highly effective pollinators but tend not to live in colonies. We also have 59 species of butterflies and 2,500 species of moths in the UK. Worldwide, we have over 20,000 species of bees, and almost the same number of butterfly and moth species. Honeybees are the only bee species that makes honey.

 

POLLINATORS AND PLANTS INTERACT IN MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL WAYS

Pollinators - bees, butterflies, moths, beetles and other insects and small mammals such as lizards - pollinate 87% of the world’s flowering plant species. When pollinators visit flowering plants, they collect pollen and carry it from flower to flower, enabling plant reproduction. At the same time, flowering plants are a food source, providing nectar that pollinators depend on for their survival.

 

POLLINATORS PROVIDE ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL BENEFITS

Flowering plants depend on pollinators for pollination, and pollination results in the proliferation of plants and provides around 77% of our global food supply. That’s not all- without pollinators most plants would die. Without plants, pollinators and the many small animal species that also rely on nectar, pollen, seeds and fruit would also decline and die, triggering catastrophic effects for other species right up through the food chain and ecosystem. 

It is the combination of life forms and their interactions with each other and with the rest of the environment that has made Earth a uniquely habitable place for humans.

POLLINATORS ARE UNDER THREAT DUE TO LOSS OF FLOWER-RICH HABITAT. CREATING AND CONSERVING SUSTAINABLE HABITAT IS CRITICAL

Every effort, no matter how small, will contribute to long-term social, cultural, globally relevant change.

Across the UK we aim to create and manage both small and landscape-scale sustainable habitats in collaboration with leading biodiversity experts and Gavin Jones, a professional landscape services company which has won awards for projects undertaken for 2012 London Olympics - Queen Elizabeth Park, Potters Field Park, Bluewater Shopping Centre, Land Securities, Coca-Cola, The Level - Brighton and Google UK, amongst others, and are appointed Royal Warrant Holders for Landscape Services to HM The Queen.

In cities, we focus on conservation for cities.

Our habitats in cities and towns improve conservation and add ecological value to many declining bee species. 

We create programmes to improve citizen engagement whilst exploring more sustainable practices of urbanisation. We focus on creating ecosystem services and resource management programmes for high-priority and high-impact conservation in urban areas. We design improvements at domestic scale to transform gardens, rooftops and unused spaces into nectar and pollen havens for a variety of bees and other pollinators, such as butterflies and moths. Our habitats in cities and towns can improve conservation and add ecological value to many declining bee species. Scientists have found that as cities contain a great diversity of sites - gardens, meadows and nature reserves - wild bee populations are abundant and diverse in urban areas compared to rural areas.

We aim to develop efficient, technologically-advanced urban farms as a key part of the solution to food security, directly impacting urban ecology, generating employment and business growth, and encouraging community cohesion and human wellbeing.

In the countryside, we focus on conservation for the countryside.

Guided by scientists and biodiversity experts we plan to design and sustainably maintain small and landscape-scale specific breeding habitats and nectar sources for a variety of wild bees and other pollinators such as butterflies and moths.

In farmlands, we focus on conservation for food and environmental sustainability.

Our agri-environmental research projects aim to promote food security and environmental sustainability, and support smallholder family farms. We incorporate both foraging pollinators and foraging abundance, wildflower borders alongside fields to conserve diverse wild bee communities and plant species. We think it makes sense to establish wild habitat for pollinators near crops with pollinator dependence as many wild bees species are better pollinators for crops than honeybees.

Across the world, we need smallholder family farms to improve global food security, to safeguard the natural environment, and to improve human health and wellbeing. 

The World Bee Project stands for the conservation of biodiversity. We believe that conservation can help achieve the basic human right to food, water, health, culture and an adequate standard of living. Empowering people to realise their rights can provide an enabling environment for meeting conservation objectives.